Hundreds of men in the United Kingdom experience fertility problems. Research carried out by Dr Stamatios Karavolos shows that male infertility impacts substantially on men’s quality of life. Indeed, receiving a diagnosis of male infertility can lead to tremendous psychosocial sequela, especially if no specific cause for the problem is identified. His research shows that men experience the feeling of ‘shock’ by the news of their infertility and they want to know ‘why’ they are infertile. His study reported denial, devastation, confusion, and frustration are among the most frequently experienced emotions described by men.

 

Men are often ‘unprepared’ for a diagnosis of infertility, especially in the absence of any biological indicators of illness. Participants in his recent study reported that they were frustrated as well as angry, because they had ‘lost control’ over their body. It appears that this loss of control over their condition is what men find most difficult and distressing. Men said that the ‘lack of answers’ or ‘lack of identifiable cause’ for their infertility made them feel even more frustrated.

 

Dr Karavolos said that tests for sperm DNA quality, like the SpermComet, provide men and couples with more information about their fertility.

 

He commented: “Unfortunately, a specific cause is not currently identified in up to 50% of cases of male infertility. The inability to offer an explanation can also be difficult for healthcare professionals, who often must admit that they don’t know any reason for the man’s problem. Sperm DNA tests are becoming increasingly important to our understanding of male infertility and can help with the discovery of new treatments”.

 

Dr Stamatios Karavolos